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medicineman
HALFLING


Joined: 21 Apr 2007
Posts: 1393
Location: Iowa City
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Captiv8 wrote:
@ medicineman: your response, while informative and on point, sounds like an essay for English class.

I must have failed to see the humor in Child of God. I saw the transition of the main character into full-blown depravity as very sad and disturbing, as well as rather inexplicable. It just seems to happen without much rhyme or reason. Anyway, I haven't read the story you mentioned by Faulkner, but I've never been a fan of his. I read As I Lay Dying and The Sound and the Fury, and I couldn't really get into either of them. I sort of just forced them since Faulkner is so well-respected. Frankly, I don't get the hype. I might think differently if I reread the books now, but I'm not in any rush. Now I'm working through McCarthy's Border Trilogy.


Yeah, I have a hard time not lapsing into talking like that when I'm talking about books. And I love to talk about McCarthy, like I said, total fanboy. I've read all his books and most at least three times. That's how I sound when I'm sincerely interested. I really can't help it. Is it bad? (I realize it doesn't sound like a GOOD essay, but, it was late and I was tired.) Anyway, I understand that feeling about Sound and The Fury and ESPECIALLY about As I Lay Dying and I stand by the recommendation about Sanctuary. I think it's some of his most accessible work.
Post Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:59 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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medicineman wrote:
Captiv8 wrote:
@ medicineman: your response, while informative and on point, sounds like an essay for English class.

I must have failed to see the humor in Child of God. I saw the transition of the main character into full-blown depravity as very sad and disturbing, as well as rather inexplicable. It just seems to happen without much rhyme or reason. Anyway, I haven't read the story you mentioned by Faulkner, but I've never been a fan of his. I read As I Lay Dying and The Sound and the Fury, and I couldn't really get into either of them. I sort of just forced them since Faulkner is so well-respected. Frankly, I don't get the hype. I might think differently if I reread the books now, but I'm not in any rush. Now I'm working through McCarthy's Border Trilogy.


Yeah, I have a hard time not lapsing into talking like that when I'm talking about books. And I love to talk about McCarthy, like I said, total fanboy. I've read all his books and most at least three times. That's how I sound when I'm sincerely interested. I really can't help it. Is it bad? (I realize it doesn't sound like a GOOD essay, but, it was late and I was tired.) Anyway, I understand that feeling about Sound and The Fury and ESPECIALLY about As I Lay Dying and I stand by the recommendation about Sanctuary. I think it's some of his most accessible work.


No worries, man. It was one of those things I felt compelled to mention. I'm about a third of the way through All the Pretty Horse right now, and really enjoying it. Unfortunately I saw the movie first, though that was a few years ago so it's hazy. Anyway, McCarthy certainly has a distinct way of writing. In fact, I'd say he has two distinct ways of writing: a more complex and verbose style expressed in books like Outer Dark and Blood Meridian, and the more terse but still eloquent style of Child of God, No Country for Old Men, and The Road. I find both really engaging, so I think that's a testament to his skill as a storyteller. McCarthy also doesn't bother with context; the reader just gets thrust into the events as they're happening.
Post Sat Feb 09, 2013 6:41 am
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INFP7



Joined: 02 Sep 2013
Posts: 19
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I started to read Joe Hill's "Heart Shaped Box". He is Stephen King's son and it seemed promising. Unfortunately, it was not good enough to even finish and just a waste of time. Feel free to put that on your do not read list no matter what Oprah says :) Now I am reading, "Art of Seduction" by Robert Greene. So far it is FAR more interesting then that stupid box book. :)
Post Sat Sep 07, 2013 1:09 am
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Sage Francis
Self Fighteous


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
Posts: 21492
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I just finished "Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates" by Tom Robbins.
I may have just found a new favorite writer. This book was hard to put down but I had to slow down the closer I got toward the end as I wanted to prolong the experience. I definitely need thank the random fan who threw this book to me at my Santa Ana show a few months ago. I've picked up several other books by Mr. Robbins, but I can't delve into them until I get my next album done. I say that now, but I may start sneaking my way into "Jitterbug Perfume" when no one's looking.
Post Sat Sep 07, 2013 1:25 am
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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It's no coincidence that those are the only Tom Robbins books I have. I've read Jitterbug Perfume only, however. I absolutely loved it. Prepare to breeze through it.
Post Sat Sep 07, 2013 8:14 am
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Neuro
A champion of Kurtis SP


Joined: 19 Jul 2002
Posts: 7626
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just got hp lovecraft the complete fiction book, basicly all his short stories in one book, ive never read any of his work before but i like this style , and like the supernatural horror type themes

also the reason why im posting this

hes from providence rhode island

anyone have any good info on him i should know? or recommend any of his stories to read before others?
Post Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:29 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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I have the same book. One of the things you'll quickly realize about Lovecraft is that he was way ahead of the curve when it came to inventive and vivid sci-fi horror. Nobody was writing about the things he was. Some of it is downright creepy, and his shit about Cthulhu is downright insane. You'll discover that some of Lovecraft's stories revolve around the fictional town of Arkham and its environs. This, I think, is a tactic utilized much later by Stephen King and his fictional town of Derry, Maine. Anyway, I would look up what stories involve Arkham (here wikipedia is your friend) and maybe read those in chronological order. It's certainly not necessary, but it might make more sense to get the total Arkham picture first.
Post Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:34 am
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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After reading Norwegian Wood I'm really starting to lose faith Haruki Murakami. The book was dull and repetitive, and I'm not sure how it propelled him to fame in Japan. The character development is absurd and absolutely unrealistic. Protagonist Toru Watanabe has unfathomably weird relationships with the two main female characters, Naoko and Midori. And the dialogue... Christ. It was just an extension of characters I never really care about. For example, Midori constantly talks about sex with Toru in the most annoying, needy way possible. And yet they never do the deed because Toru's penis is lassoed to Naoko's emotional instability. And SPOILER ALERT



Everybody around Toru is committing suicide. By my count, Kizuki, Hatsumi, and Naoko. And you know what? Since I never cared about Naoko's character in the first place, and I suspected she would kill herself sooner or later, I wanted it MUCH sooner so I didn't have to hear her terribly conceived emotional problems anymore. Shit, I wanted Midori to get hit by a train too for being such an emotional waif. The only character I did care about, aside from Toru himself (thank God, or I wouldn't have made it) was Reiko. And then, SPOILER ALERT



Toru has sex with her too and some Mrs. Robinson shit, after he's been so brokenhearted about Naoko offing herself. Understand that Reiko is like 40 and was Naoko's best friend and mentor at the mental asylum they both stayed at. Then, right after Naoko's dies she travels to Tokyo to meet up with Toru and they hold their own personal funeral for Naoko. And then Reiko and Toru are apparently so consumed with lust that they bang four times. Makes sense.

They only reason I read this whole fucking piece of garbage was I kept hoping that something interesting would happen, or that there would be some kind of unforeseen twist. Nope. This is 294 pages of wasted time. I have Sputnik Sweetheart on the shelf at home, and if that doesn't wow me I'm getting rid of all things Murakami except Kafka on the Shore, which is awesome.
Post Sat Mar 15, 2014 7:37 am
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