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Massive bird and fish die off in Arkansas
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Strange Famous Forum > Social stuff. Political stuff. KNOWMORE

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zagadka
DARK PAST HAVER


Joined: 30 Nov 2004
Posts: 4931
Location: Hous of Gaga
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xGREENxCLOVERx wrote:
zagadka wrote:
X the Outsider wrote:
jakethesnake wrote:
futuristxen wrote:
This is worrisome, no? Like when all the Bees started dying...

If the apocalypse happened, would it be a trending topic?


I thought I read something recently that was hinting at a pesticide or something that is what is causing the bee problem. I could have dreamed that too.


I heard that too, but I also heard it was some kind of mite too.


maybe it was mites covered in pesticide.

Cell phones: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xB8EmFAYL7U (embedding disabled)


who needs bees anyway.... i just rub my tomato plant's private parts together so they make fat tomato babies. No beez needed. They are NOT the bees' knees.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:33 pm
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redball



Joined: 12 May 2006
Posts: 6870
Location: Northern New Jersey
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It was a combination of a fungus and a virus that killed the bees. While other factors may be involved in the overall thinning of the bee population its these two things that are behind the massive colony deaths.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/07/science/07bees.html?_r=2
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:46 pm
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firefly



Joined: 27 Sep 2002
Posts: 3990
Location: Montreal
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Flossin wrote:
Saw this on the news yesterday. No dead birds or fish in Europe, though (at least none that I know of..).


Forgot to mention the fish (the links I posted before only mentions the birds.)

Arkansa:
http://www.todaysthv.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=136401&catid=2

Maryland:
http://www.wbaltv.com/news/26357581/detail.html

South Wales:
http://www.bymnews.com/news/newsDetails.php?id=79520

Brazil:
http://www.parana-online.com.br/editoria/cidades/news/502434/?noticia=MORTANDADE+MISTERIOSA+DE+PEIXES+NO+LITORAL#id=google_ads_frame5&parent=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.parana-online.com.br&rpctoken=adsense_rpc_key&_methods=expand%2Ccollapse%2C_ready%2C_close%2C_open%2C_resizeMe

Italy:
http://corrierefiorentino.corriere.it/firenze/notizie/cronaca/2010/28-dicembre-2010/strage-del-mare-natale-181158495607.shtml

New Zealand:
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10697906

The massive fish kills have been happening since just after the BP spill and the spraying of Corexit.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:47 pm
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jakethesnake
guy who cried about wrestling being real


Joined: 03 Feb 2006
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A 2012 virus redball? You don't say?
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:51 pm
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Szechwan



Joined: 19 Mar 2007
Posts: 587
Location: Vancouver Island
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Without bees I'll never be able to make my Tommacco.




side note: my dad actually had the kickass hobby of beekeeping while I was growing up. Such a random thing in retrospect, but it was a pretty awesome to hang around. I will forever respect bees more than any insect in the world.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:56 pm
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redball



Joined: 12 May 2006
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Location: Northern New Jersey
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No, I'm with X the Outsider, I like this one:

http://www.ebiblefellowship.com/may21/index.html
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 3:00 pm
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medicineman
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Joined: 21 Apr 2007
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Location: Iowa City
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Barring the emergence of factors unknown I think I can safely present myself as the board bird guy, no?

If I can kill the fun for a moment the birds were probably struck by lightning. There were unusually strong storms in the area that night. Red-winged blackbirds live in large groups throughout the year, and, like many corvids (blackbirds, crows, ravens, etc) may gather in very, very large flocks in the wintertime, numbering into the thousands and tens of thousands of birds. When flocks of blackbirds fly, they generally fly in a fairly tight pack, and may fly at pretty significant altitude, up to a few thousand feet, which is pretty unusual for most birds. Why there would be a huge flock so high in the middle of such a large storm is somewhat unusual but not unheard of. Even one particularly strong stroke of lightning, or several in quick succession, would certainly be capable of frying hundreds of birds at the same time...they would probably be so close to each other as to even conduct the current between themselves. And, at close range, the sheer concussive force of thunder would probably be enough to rupture tiny organs, and even the shock from being exposed to the noise of a large clap of thunder could probably kill many more. So while the timing is a strange, and the fact that it's blackbirds does make it creepy, you can probably Occam's Razor this one up.

As for the fish kill, I would say that is the more likely thing to chalk up to pesticide, or more likely, manure. Farmers sometimes spread manure on their fields in the winter in preparation for the spring, sometimes when the dirt is frozen, although I don't know if that'd be the case in Arkansas. Generally this is okay as long as their isn't a big snowmelt or an unsual rain that comes along to wash the manure off and into the watershed. However, there was a big unusual rain that came along and probably did just that.

So yeah...while I'd like to believe that these are the first and second plagues of Arkansas, these are all events that are definitely explainable considering the weather conditions, and not really unprecedented, or in fact, all that odd.

Edit: I hadn't read about the birds in other places, but those number are much much less alarming. Again, in the case of blackbirds, there are often so many concentrated in one area that one ill can befall many, many at the same time. Cornell dude's theory about them being sucked up and soaked is also probably legit. I hadn't considered that...the idea that they were hunkered down in a tree together makes more sense than them being in flight, although I still wouldn't rule it out
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 4:23 pm
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Juan
girls don juan anything to do with me


Joined: 16 Sep 2003
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I think it makes much more sense that the Mayans just hated blackbirds and threw a curse at them. the fish were just casualties of war.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 4:52 pm
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
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Location: the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption
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a few thousand or ten thousand fish dying isn't extraordinary. it's more common that you'd think. low oxygen levels, pollutants, a various other factors can cause the kills.

i don't know if la nina is to blame for some of these kills but it's certainly in full effect over australia.

looks to me like it was a rather extraordinary event with the blackbirds and the rest of the stories are just run of the mill kills that people are noticing due to the increased attention.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:09 pm
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medicineman
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crash wrote:
a few thousand or ten thousand fish dying isn't extraordinary. it's more common that you'd think. low oxygen levels, pollutants, a various other factors can cause the kills.

i don't know if la nina is to blame for some of these kills but it's certainly in full effect over australia.

looks to me like it was a rather extraordinary event with the blackbirds and the rest of the stories are just run of the mill kills that people are noticing due to the increased attention.


I agree, although I still think the birds nearly-certainly weather related. Upon further reading about the fish apparently it was only drum fish that died in the kill...to have a large kill only take one particular species is in fact pretty unusual and puts a dent in my agricultural runoff theory. But yes, it could be a lot of things.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:14 pm
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
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Location: the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption
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medicineman wrote:
crash wrote:
a few thousand or ten thousand fish dying isn't extraordinary. it's more common that you'd think. low oxygen levels, pollutants, a various other factors can cause the kills.

i don't know if la nina is to blame for some of these kills but it's certainly in full effect over australia.

looks to me like it was a rather extraordinary event with the blackbirds and the rest of the stories are just run of the mill kills that people are noticing due to the increased attention.


I agree, although I still think the birds nearly-certainly weather related. Upon further reading about the fish apparently it was only drum fish that died in the kill...to have a large kill only take one particular species is in fact pretty unusual and puts a dent in my agricultural runoff theory. But yes, it could be a lot of things.

i'm not disagreeing with you about the birds, just saying the event was extraordinary whereas the other kills seem more common place. i don't know anything about drum but if they are particularly prone to hypoxia then the run off could lead to an anaerobic environment, killing off large numbers. that's pure conjecture though.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:35 pm
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T-Wrex
p00ny tang


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
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birds are cool..

i never cared or payed attention the all the varieties when i was a kid or a teen.. but now that i'm an old man, every time I see something i don't recognize, i run home and use WhatBird.com to find out what it was....

in fact, i used it today..

I was going about 55 down the freeway today when a flock of Black-bellied Plovers started flying next to me.. the way they moved so fast and synchronized, it reminded me of a fish school... they kept up with me for at least a quarter mile then i had to go under a bridge and they peeled off..


a couple weeks ago, i saw this huge flock of a good thousand or two.. and went home to find out what it was... they were European Starlings... apparently, they're not native and somewhat invasive.. they were introduced to America ages ago in an attempt to populate the eastern seaboard with all the birds ever mentioned by Shakespeare...
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:44 pm
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medicineman
HALFLING


Joined: 21 Apr 2007
Posts: 1393
Location: Iowa City
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T-Wrex wrote:
birds are cool..

i never cared or payed attention the all the varieties when i was a kid or a teen.. but now that i'm an old man, every time I see something i don't recognize, i run home and use WhatBird.com to find out what it was....

in fact, i used it today..

I was going about 55 down the freeway today when a flock of Black-bellied Plovers started flying next to me.. the way they moved so fast and synchronized, it reminded me of a fish school... they kept up with me for at least a quarter mile then i had to go under a bridge and they peeled off..


a couple weeks ago, i saw this huge flock of a good thousand or two.. and went home to find out what it was... they were European Starlings... apparently, they're not native and somewhat invasive.. they were introduced to America ages ago in an attempt to populate the eastern seaboard with all the birds ever mentioned by Shakespeare...


Yes, the European Starling is one of our most populous birds now and has become so in the space of a scant hundred years. Like blackbirds, they are quite bright and social and live in very large groups, and sometimes associate with them. (A few starlings were killed in this blackbird kill as well, in fact.) They are fairly territorial and aggressive; as such, they pose a threat to our native woodpeckers because they prefer to nest in holes in trees, although, unlike woodpeckers, they are quite adaptable in both diet and habitat and so really they don't need to. Basically they are kind of jerks.


On another note, yaaay someone else who likes birds! I didn't know about whatbird.com either, thanks. The plovers sounds neat...I don't have a lot of experience with seabirds but in what limited experience that I do have I've often felt as those their behavior resembles that of fish.
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 5:58 pm
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
Posts: 5456
Location: the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption
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the story i heard was that some guy who really liked shakespeare released all the birds mentioned in his plays in central park. most died but the starlings were very successful.

i used to work in wetlands with a guy who loved birds (what do you call them anyway?). it was fascinating to watch him just hear a birds call and tell me what kind it was, the sex, whether it was a juvenile or adult and what it was doing (danger call, mating call, etc). he had a little book he kept with him to log sighting of migratory birds that he entered to some internet database that tracked the patterns and reach of the migrations.


Last edited by crash on Tue Jan 04, 2011 6:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 6:19 pm
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medicineman
HALFLING


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Location: Iowa City
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crash wrote:
the story i heard was that some guy who really liked shakespeare released all the birds mentioned in his plays in central park. most died but the starlings were very successful.




I believe that this is actually the truth, or at least it's actually the story. For what would seem to be a venture in beautification, he certainly chose the ugliest of the world's starlings...some of our European friends may be confused by the term European Starling as there are several kinds there, and across the world, many of which are quite beautiful.










Ours for comparison:

Post Tue Jan 04, 2011 6:29 pm
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