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selfworth



Joined: 07 Jun 2004
Posts: 1109
Location: maryland
life sustaining planet possibly found  Reply with quote  

this could be interesting. let's just hope there are no predators up on that bitch.

http://news.spreadit.org/new-planet-gliese-581g-goldilocks-planet/
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:04 pm
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Plum Puddin'



Joined: 26 May 2008
Posts: 1829
Location: Run Ebola, Run.
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Why cant we give new planets better names?

Gliese 581g?
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:15 pm
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leifkolt



Joined: 01 May 2009
Posts: 293
Location: Where good people go to die.
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Dude says he thinks probability of life is 100%... sick.

It would only take about 74,400 years to get there... I'm done with earth... Who's coming with me!!!?
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:28 pm
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C.R.A.Z.Y



Joined: 18 Feb 2008
Posts: 2734
Location: Vote for me and i'll vote for you.
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well it is also a fascinating find, in the habitable zone, because it is so close to it's sun that a portion of it is too cold, a portion is too hot and a portion is just right to sustain life. sounds like the never ending story.

so there's a band on it, that is habitable. they say even if it's not populated by animals or humanoids or whatnot there will probably be at least some sort of life form like bacteria or single cell protozoa or something.

it's exciting to me. very much!
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:44 pm
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CriticalTheory_Breakfast



Joined: 16 Apr 2007
Posts: 1404
Location: NYC/Rochester
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to me, the most important part about this is that it gives credibility to the nearly unfuckwitable theory that Earth has many planets just like it out in the universe. Planets that not only have water and sustainability, but perhaps humanoids even more advanced than us.

74,400 years?shit let's launch a monkey at it right now! timesawastin'!
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:59 pm
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Mr Jenkins



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
Posts: 602
Location: Aotearoa
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according to close encounters of the third kind we'll need this to communicate
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:55 pm
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Neuro
A champion of Kurtis SP


Joined: 19 Jul 2002
Posts: 7789
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beware of the Reptiles
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 9:12 pm
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Bicycle



Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Posts: 413
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Mr Jenkins wrote:
according to close encounters of the third kind we'll need this to communicate



shit yeah we do

and sun ra

thats about it
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 9:18 pm
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squirtisblow



Joined: 12 Mar 2003
Posts: 1587
Location: SFV
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this article goes into a little more detail.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11444022
Post Thu Sep 30, 2010 9:24 pm
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mindtoast



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
Posts: 664
Location: australia
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While awesome for science i don't buy the idea that a tidally locked planet can support anything much in the form of life.

Red dwarfs are cranky, they are super variable in their light output. Can you imagine life on earth if the sun was dimming out and then ramping up again over long periods?
The thin hospitable band on the edge of the dark and light sides of the planet might either migrate back and forth, or even disappear / reappear over millennia. You might get a far higher rate of extinction / diversification evolution rate than is helpful.

One of the most important life considerations for a tidally locked planet close to a red dwarf are a thick atmosphere which can spread and even out the heat, make it more palatable for life. A sun that always throwing tantrums can strip fragile atmospheres off into space in chunks.

Photosynthesis prefers visible light, not red dwarf hippy infrared light.

Lastly, a geodynamo is in essence what keeps a planet alive. It causes the magnetic field that protects us from evil radiation. One of the reasons mars is so fucked is its geodynamo is crappy, so there's no protective magnetic field and almost the entire atmosphere blew away.
A tidally locked planet in close to a star is most likely to have a shithouse geodynamo.

i'm sure life can happen on a planet around a red dwarf, just maybe not this one. It could certainly have primitive life sure.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 5:14 am
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invisiblewindow



Joined: 31 Dec 2002
Posts: 1063
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here comes the battle between the Glieseans and the Earth dwelling Reptilians.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:52 am
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MP3D
Straaaange FAMOUS!


Joined: 28 Apr 2005
Posts: 2621
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invisiblewindow wrote:
here comes the battle between the Glieseans and the Earth dwelling Reptilians.


Earth dwelling Reptilians are merely the product of interbreeding. the reptilians are interdemensiontial beings who use interbreeeding with humans to form a "spacesuit" to experience our (5 sense) reality. they cold care less about Glieseans.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:03 am
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breakreep
homophobic yet curious


Joined: 27 Sep 2004
Posts: 6627
Location: Fifth Jerusalem
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C.R.A.Z.Y wrote:
well it is also a fascinating find, in the habitable zone, because it is so close to it's sun that a portion of it is too cold, a portion is too hot and a portion is just right to sustain life. sounds like the never ending story.

so there's a band on it, that is habitable.


I'm not sure if you're conflating the habitable portion of the planet with what is called a "habitable zone" (clearly I think, but don't know, that you are), but they're not the same thing. Distance from a star doesn't cause variable planetary temperatures in the way that (I think) you're assuming, except to the extent that planets--like Gliese 181-g--which are very close to their parent stars are more likely than distant planets to be tidally locked. Variable simultaneous planetary temperatures are caused by axial tilt and day-night cycles, not distance from a star.

The habitable zone, as a term, refers to that portion of a solar system in which liquid water is likely to be found consistently in a given similar sample star set. The constant habitable zone, which is generally referred to incorrectly simply as the habitable zone, describes that portion of the system which maintains a habitable zone for billions of years (long enough for life to both develop and then evolve into complex forms). The zone varies depending on the type of star being orbited.

Sol's habitable zone currently is between Venus and Earth, its habitable zone will eventually be between Earth and Mars, and its constant habitable zone is that portion of the two which overlap, defining a very narrow range that Earth is not quite in the center of (yes, we could actually be MORE habitable!). Of course, to illuminate the somewhat arbitrary nature of our definition of a constant habitable zone, one need only look far enough into our future and see our seas boiling away from solar radiation to realize "constant" is subjective.

Anyway, Gliese 181-a's current habitable zone is probably between about .11 and .21 AU from itself, a zone which g, at .14 AU, is smack dab inside of. This is, for comparison's sake, inside the orbit of Mercury. If Gliese 181-a were identical to Sol then g would be a barren wasteland, but not only is it likely that g is habitable but there are two planets to either side of it which may also be, if not habitable themselves, then in possession of habitable moons (it's a very cramped solar system).

As for only a certain part of the planet being the "right temperature for life" (there is quite a bit we don't know about this, though), that depends on the exact nature of its orbit, rotation, atmosphere, and a host of other factors. Here I need to address a few things that mindtoast said, first that we don't know that Gliese 181-g is tidally locked to its sun. We in fact know nothing about the nature of its rotation beyond premature probabilistic models. It might have a 2:1 rotational period, or a 3:1, or a 3:2, or a 4:1, etc (not necessarily ad infinitum because these are statistically less likely with increasing disparities between the sizes of the two halves of the ratio).

Additionally, there is plenty of life on Earth that is entirely separate from any photosynthesis-containing food chain. There are organisms here that can eat methane, things that drink ammonia, things that munch on salt and shit out methane. There are archaea and bacteria that, basically, eat rocks, in pressures that would implode a human in a fraction of a second, in temperatures that would melt your skin off before you'd finished imploding. We know of bacteria that live in nuclear reactor cooling baths--no red dwarf variable radiation pattern is going to kill these types of creatures, especially given that they can, theoretically, live dozens of miles, maybe even hundreds, below the crust.

This is all throwing aside the most common conclusion I've heard about this thing in the last day or so, which is that if it is tidally locked, there is no reason fairly complex multi-celled organisms couldn't evolve in its terminator. As for any sort of person-like organism, or even a tree or a cat, that's wild speculation at this point. Nobody knows.

Also, that article was crappy. "Some scientists now think there may be billions of inhabitable planets"? Fuck, which ones, the ones that just took their first astronomy class? Fucking news, butchering science as always.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:24 pm
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
Posts: 5456
Location: the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption
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great post break. mind toast too.

for those of you not in the know (which included me until i looked this up), tidal locking is when one side of a satellite always faces the body which it rotates around (like the moon does to earth) - that is, it takes the same time to rotate on it's axis as it does to complete an orbit. the effect this would have on a planet rotating around a star would be make one side extremely hot and the other extremely cold, which would obviously make conditions less favorable for life.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 2:43 pm
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Hellen Earth
could be a girl. could be a guy.


Joined: 09 Jan 2003
Posts: 1281
Location: Fitchburg, MA
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i really think they are prepping us for disclosure. there has been crazy coverage of this story along with the UNs 'Alien' Ambassador. a rep for the Vatican recently said he'd baptize an extraterrestrial. slowly acclimating people to the idea we aren't alone so it's not so much of a shock when mile wide motherships show up.
Post Fri Oct 01, 2010 4:55 pm
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