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Eminem is the best selling artist of the decade. SMH
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badjerk



Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 427
Location: pdx
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sick_transit wrote:
Alan Hague wrote:
Creed sold over 9 million units?! Jesus...





thats hilarious. im gonna have to downgrade his value to my fantasy team
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:47 pm
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zeem



Joined: 29 Apr 2003
Posts: 3885
Location: elsewhere
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NOTE: spoilers for anyone who hasn't seen funny people.

Eminem gets it right on in this scene. The past decade of his music was worth it for this scene.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:58 pm
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Sarcastro



Joined: 27 Sep 2002
Posts: 3281
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I love this board, guy sells almost 14 mil on two albums and you guys reduce it to the fact that he said faggot every once in a while.

his first 3 albums were all pretty great, and the 3rd one was incredible.

Now let's all go back to judging without experiencing. We're all the best at that.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:02 pm
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Raoul DeGroot



Joined: 30 Apr 2009
Posts: 2437
Location: Son Quest
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Who said all that?
I thought people didn't care for him because he's trapped at attention-hungry, angry teenager stage and is a waste of skill.

I swear some of you anti-PC guys are just bursting at the seams to cry out against persecution.

And what's all this experience you need to have some idea about saying faggot? I think we all have experience with calling people fags at some point in our lives. I'd say if we were judging, we'd be judging with experience. Unless eminem has some special knowledge about the applicability of fag as "weak person". Like maybe he arm-wrestled a lot of fags and beat them handily. So then he was like, "Okay, Fags:Weak Person. If I see this on the SAT I will know what to do."
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:08 pm
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Sarcastro



Joined: 27 Sep 2002
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i meant experience as in, experiencing/listening to the album before writing it off.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:52 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8547
Location: Third Coast
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Good for Eminem. I still put in the Marshall Mathers LP from time to time, but I will admit that I stopped listening after that. Too much of the same cartoonish lack of anything compelling, naw mean? The whole list is a microcosm of societal makeup at large, and, if that's true, it's also really sad. How can so many people have terrible music taste?
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 6:54 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8547
Location: Third Coast
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Raoul DeGroot wrote:
And what's all this experience you need to have some idea about saying faggot? I think we all have experience with calling people fags at some point in our lives. I'd say if we were judging, we'd be judging with experience. Unless eminem has some special knowledge about the applicability of fag as "weak person". Like maybe he arm-wrestled a lot of fags and beat them handily. So then he was like, "Okay, Fags:Weak Person. If I see this on the SAT I will know what to do."


Gold. Well put DeGroot.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 6:56 pm
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AdamBomb



Joined: 05 Mar 2004
Posts: 3183
Location: Louisiana
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Captiv8 wrote:
Raoul DeGroot wrote:
And what's all this experience you need to have some idea about saying faggot? I think we all have experience with calling people fags at some point in our lives. I'd say if we were judging, we'd be judging with experience. Unless eminem has some special knowledge about the applicability of fag as "weak person". Like maybe he arm-wrestled a lot of fags and beat them handily. So then he was like, "Okay, Fags:Weak Person. If I see this on the SAT I will know what to do."


Gold. Well put DeGroot.


Heh, this discussion would not take place on Philaflava.

But seriously, I wonder how many people who are upset over belittling homosexuals are totally cool with other artists who have songs belittling women.

Also, why the Eminem hate? Aren't we glad for hip hop to be on the top...or would you be happier with Toby Keith or Michael Boobly-Yay grabbing the top spot? I just don't get it. If not Eminem, please state who you would have rather held the spot (be realistic).
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:38 pm
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marshall84



Joined: 15 Jul 2002
Posts: 2154
Location: KS
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I think Eminem's homoeroticism takes the edge off his homophobia. There's all of those Ken Kaniff skits, Eminem cross-dressing in his videos, his fascination with gay sex, etc. On his new album, he has that entire song about being sexually abused by his dad. A lot of it is just to shock people, yeah, but stuff like his 2nd verse in 'Rain Man' (which is a fucking bizarre song in general) is more revealing. He loves to talk about faggots.

He definitely deserves what he's got, though. He stuff is waaaay more interesting that a lot of that shit. He has a lot of shitty stuff, but he has written quite a few fantastic songs.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 8:06 pm
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Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
Posts: 2023
Location: Saint Louis Park, MN
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Man. I was making a joke when I brought that shit up. Maybe it's an age thing. I'm old enough to actually remember all of the press nine years ago, and people responding to the fact that the Marshall Mathers LP had almost gone diamond by saying that most of the people buying it were only interested in it for the controversy.

That CD is more than 70 minutes long. Almost no filler. Guest vocals from several different platinum artists, a ton of Dr. Dre production. Three monster singles, and a fourth song that also charted in the first year. The song Stan was so well-received that the Dido song he sampled hit number one on the Billboard Top 40, and her album (No Angel) went platinum in the United States nearly two years after it was first released.

The album was also national news. He made a song about his wife which was a murder fantasy so vicious and hateful that she was widely reported to have attempted suicide as a result of it.

It was one of the first times in modern music that someone had gone so personal, so brutal, and so public.

The album made Eminem instantly notorious, and moved the discussion about him from what it had been (impressive newcomer, pop crossover rapper, white guy cashing in on Dr. Dre) to something closer to genuine legendary status in rap circles. Legendary is a good word for the album, actually. It's not a classic in the traditional sense of an album that changed the way we think about a genre or an era -- it's more like it stands unblemished at the center of a smoking crater, like an Arthur C. Clarke monolith. It landed, it distorted the world around it for a time, and then eventually its influence over us faded and we moved on. A classic is defined by the way it ages along with us. That which is legendary is instead defined by its agelessness.

Oh, yeah, and the homophobia thing. The album succeeded first, and that's what GLAAD got pissed about, and protested. Looking back at that nine years later, I'm reminded more of the GEICO Cavemen than I am of anything else. Eminem did a song at the Grammys with Elton John, and suddenly the issue went from being a matter for mainstream debate to being a topic of activist infighting. For the most part, people packed up their shit and started looking for the next controversy. Eminem toned down the language in subsequent releases, not so much because somebody changed his mind about it, but more because he won that fight and decided to move on to something else.

In fact, he spent huge portions of his next album wondering aloud why people had made such a big deal about whether or not the things he had to say were politically acceptable. He made the point, especially in Sing for the Moment, that the people who buy his music weren't buying it for the controversy, but because the music genuinely resonated with them. He wasn't wrong about that, even if a lot of those same people who bought the album grew up to be embarrassed by what it meant to them.

So, yeah. Saying that people bought the album to argue about whether or not it's okay to say faggot is an argument made in bad faith. People who said it at the time were doing so because they wanted to dismiss the idea that something so powerful and so ugly could be garnering both critical and commercial success on its own merits. They said the appeal was shock value, because they didn't want to admit that music packed full of so much rage and despair could have some kind of universality to it.

People who say the same thing now, that most of the album sales were because of the controversy, I'm less sure about. Sometimes we hear a thing enough times, and start thinking it's true.
Post Wed Dec 09, 2009 11:53 pm
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Sage Francis
Self Fighteous


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
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AdamBomb wrote:
Heh, this discussion would not take place on Philaflava.


If it can't be summed up in an emoticon then it can't be discussed.
Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:00 am
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Neuro
A champion of Kurtis SP


Joined: 19 Jul 2002
Posts: 7796
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if eminem wanted to do a song with you sage

would you do it?
Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:18 am
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Sage Francis
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Joined: 30 Jun 2002
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My immediate impulse is to say "no." But since this is purely rhetorical, I thought of some instances where it might work out and be fun.
Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:24 am
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sparrow



Joined: 11 Aug 2009
Posts: 331
Location: stolen land, the place where spirits get eaten.
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i bought his first 12" and LP and they are now in the basement next to the worn out sneakers. i maybe played the 12 a total of 3 times in public. after that i didn't care what he was doing even though dre was behind him and he got a marketing push comparable to the backstreet boys. he became another commercial personality i ignored. from my perspective he isn't doing anything interesting on an artistic level. id rather listen to some no name kid making experimental music on myspace than put one of eminems records on. yeah a massive amount of people bought his music but a massive amount of people buy mcdonalds everyday too.
Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 1:01 am
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mars seven



Joined: 22 Apr 2009
Posts: 77
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well-deserved.
Post Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:02 am
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