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PHIL LACIO AKA P DAWG
the godfather of troll


Joined: 18 Oct 2002
Posts: 4825
Sage gets top-billing on AZ website  Reply with quote  

this is the local main news site in AZ sage is the featured music artist
doesn't appear a local person did the story though

Rapper Francis maintains healthy distrust
Len Righi
Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.)
May. 31, 2007 12:00 AM
Sage Francis never flinches when discussing the instigative ingredients he sometimes uses to season his edgy raps.



Well, almost never.



Questioned about a potential line-crossing line in the penultimate track of his new disc, Human the Death Dance, he audibly wavers during a phone interview from his Rhode Island home. advertisement






The source of his discomfort comes about three-fifths of the way through Hoofprints in the Sand: "There's been too much murder and not enough martyr/Why is it no one else wants to impress Jodie Foster?" he asks, after cataloging, with increasing disgust, the many social and political ills facing this country - anti-intellectualism, drug abuse, disregard for the environment, racial turmoil, intrusive government.



Of course, to impress Jodie Foster is the reason cited by John W. Hinckley Jr. in a letter to the actress to explain his assassination attempt on President Reagan in 1981.



Asked if he had any misgivings about using the Jodie Foster line, the 30-year-old rapper replies, "Absolutely not. It's a metaphor for why aren't people taking drastic measures during a time of extreme horror. It is expressing surprise that there has been no attempt to overthrow the government. I'm not saying we need to do this, just that I'm surprised there's no great resistance. Everybody's just really docile, or on some drug."



Hoofprints in the Sand was "a last-minute inclusion on the album," Francis says. "On this record I tried to stay away from the overtly political (material) that was so prevalent on (2005's) A Healthy Distrust, but I thought there was value in giving a nod back to Distrust and not abandoning my ability to bitch and complain."



Two years ago, after almost a decade as a pro in the hip-hop underground, Sage Francis rumbled to the surface with A Healthy Distrust. On that politically charged thunderbolt, he hurled shrewd metaphors and caustic commentary with old-school fervor and supreme confidence. His poetry slam background added extra voltage.



On Human the Death Dance, released May 8, Francis turns his gaze inward. A moody, at times ireful, but generally absorbing chronicle of a life in upheaval, the rapper sounds chastened, wounded, resigned and vulnerable.



"The material I'm dealing with is as close to home as you can get," says Francis (ne Paul Francis). "I've gone through a couple of bad breakups - one that was very devastating - over my inability to maintain a healthy household. It sucked. There was other stuff happening, too. It was time for me to go back and get it out of my head so I could have a little bit of control over it."



He also thought it was important to provide to people who might be hearing him for the first time "a clear, simple, play-by-play of how my career developed" - including having to decide whether to exploit the fact that he is white, or disguise it.



Parts of Death Dance can be grim, even harrowing. The single Got Up This Morning is a G. Love-style, blues-flecked tune featuring an Appalachian holler from Jolie Holland with Sage Francis comparing the bedroom to a terrordome. On Keep Moving, he sounds increasingly desperate as he contends with "a half-truth harlot" and tries to summon the courage to avoid "a domestic death sentence." On the brooding Hell of a Year, he relates how his post-breakup life has become "all bone and curdle."



Francis calls Hell of a Year "the mothership of the record. It was the first song I recorded. It was me reflecting back on 2005. After the relationship fell to pieces, I had a bit of a nervous breakdown and so did the other person. ... I don't want to put anyone on blast, but that was some really dark (stuff) for me."



But Death Dance is not all gloom and doom. Underground for Dummies is a trenchant recap of Francis' exploits in an industry he says is full of empty promises, while Midgets and Giants is a slash-and-burn assault on hip-hop's trappings, cliches and mythology.



"Underground," says Francis, should dispel any notion that "maybe I make this music on a whim, that I don't record in a popular style of hip-hop because I'm unable to. ... I just don't want to. That chorus-based stuff has ruined hip-hop. Lyricism has gone the way of the dodo bird. Literary technique has gone out the window. Now it's, 'How well can I brag about my life?' ... There's no deeper message than do what you have to do to get money."



Midgets and Giants, with its pointed dis of Eminem's movie 8 Mile, "is an all-out attack, me at a breaking point," Francis says.



"8 Mile isn't true. It's a Hollywood picture, a modern-day Rocky," he points out. "It's fake and insulting. Rappers do not submit to a battle and get a record deal, so all these cats who dropped out of school to be rappers really (screwed) themselves. ... People need to have safety nets. So the message should be: Stay in school!"


http://www.azcentral.com/ent/music/articles/0531francis0531-ON.html
Post Sun Jun 03, 2007 2:22 pm
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CriticalTheory_Breakfast



Joined: 16 Apr 2007
Posts: 1404
Location: NYC/Rochester
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Interesting insight on a few of the tunes actually.
the Jodie Foster line is classic.






but Got Up This Morning is a G.Love style tune? I don't see that.
Post Sun Jun 03, 2007 2:35 pm
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PHIL LACIO AKA P DAWG
the godfather of troll


Joined: 18 Oct 2002
Posts: 4825
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CriticalTheory_Breakfast wrote:
Interesting insight on a few of the tunes actually.
the Jodie Foster line is classic.






but Got Up This Morning is a G.Love style tune? I don't see that.



ya that line was bullshit
Post Sun Jun 03, 2007 2:57 pm
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Tempest



Joined: 26 Apr 2003
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8 mile is a good film.
Post Mon Jun 04, 2007 8:12 am
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ko-d



Joined: 15 Sep 2005
Posts: 236
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I last watched 8 mile half a decade ago, but...

Isn't one of the movie's messages to have safety nets? Isn't that why Eminem goes right back to work after he wins the battle, even though his friends tell him not to?

And I don't remember anyone getting a record deal from a battle in the movie either. Maybe I need to watch it again.

Plus didn't Jin get a record deal in real life specifically from winning battles (on BET)?
Post Mon Jun 04, 2007 9:19 am
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Jedi



Joined: 08 Jun 2006
Posts: 502
Location: Pittsburgh/NYC
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ko-d wrote:
I last watched 8 mile half a decade ago, but...

Isn't one of the movie's messages to have safety nets? Isn't that why Eminem goes right back to work after he wins the battle, even though his friends tell him not to?

And I don't remember anyone getting a record deal from a battle in the movie either. Maybe I need to watch it again.

Plus didn't Jin get a record deal in real life specifically from winning battles (on BET)?


Yeah, he definitely doesn't win a record deal at the end of 8 Mile. It seems he wins the battle to prove his worth to himself more than anything.

But, yeah the movie was kind of shitty.

Jin got a record deal, but who knows if it was entirely based upon his freestyle friday winnings. plus, look at his career. not exactly living the slim shady lifestyle quite yet.
Post Mon Jun 04, 2007 9:37 am
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Sage Francis
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Joined: 30 Jun 2002
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it's not about the actual story line of the movie. it's about blurring the line between the fake story and the real story. people watch that movie understanding the Eminem went on to be one of the biggests acts in music...and essentially this film is supposed to be like "here's how shit went down before..."
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:12 am
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The Shards



Joined: 10 May 2007
Posts: 139
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I liked how they played Lose Yourself in the end credits, which was probably the no.1 single at the time
a weird intersection of fiction and reality
but it was cool though
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:37 am
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Sage Francis
Self Fighteous


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
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it was also a great way for him to clear his name with all the mom's who went out and bought an eminem cd for little Jennifer
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:39 am
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Tempest



Joined: 26 Apr 2003
Posts: 1002
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haterrrrrrr.
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 6:14 am
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Jesse Custer



Joined: 01 Dec 2006
Posts: 1258
Location: London
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[quote=tempest]8 mile is a good film.[/quote]

That's not true. Regardless of how accurate the film was, or how people interpretted the message or what, it was still pretty piss poor; script, acting, direction - weak!

The plot was so thin, every scene was such a transparent vehicle for like "now we want Eminem to be angry!", and "now he's very pensive" or some shit. I dunno.. maybe it was just his bad acting.
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 7:10 am
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Nathan Shupe



Joined: 15 Aug 2006
Posts: 736
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I love it when Eminem is in his trailer and his mom says "What are you doing with your life that's so great, Rabbit?". It's my favorite scene. I quote that one line quite a bit. Pretty bad movie though...
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 7:18 am
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The Shards



Joined: 10 May 2007
Posts: 139
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honestly i thought 8 Mile was a great film
Marshall is hardly Marlon Brando but the director knew how to handle him, and he had very good support
it's not the meetiest of scripts but it's one of those films built around a centre-piece, in this case the rap battles, so it doesn't really matter
the look and style of it was good too

i mean what were you expecting? 'Eminem stars in Curtis Hanson's thoughtful adaptation of Webster's The White Devil...' Really it far exceeds the 'world's biggest rocknroll star makes forray into acting' expectations by some margin
Post Thu Jun 14, 2007 8:22 am
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