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xGasPricesx



Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 1566
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mancabbage wrote:
hmm fuck salvia, me and my mates did that back in the day, one of us ran out the tent and tried to dive head first into the fire, the other rotated on the spot for a while and thought he was dead while i just sat there also thinking i'd just died and pulled the biggest whitey on the way, awful stuff


Yeah, I only did it once when it first hit the market out here and was so out of my mind that I thought I was the devil and I was walking around Godzilla like through some city condemning people to hell, and then an even bigger devil came along and told me I was slacking on the job and condemned me to an eternity inside this little box that he had physically shoved me inside of. This whole process only lasted 10 minutes in real world time, but it really felt like an eternity to me, and when I came to I found myself curled up in a ball in the dirt and my friends informed me that I had been laughing maniacally for the whole duration of the trip. I forget the exact potency of the one, but it was one of the mid-range or high potency types and I had taken a huge rip out of a bong and the last thing I remember before I came to was just holding it in my lungs for a few seconds.

I've never touched the stuff since and have absolutely no interest in ever doing so again, but I have seen plenty of friends do it since to varying degrees of madness, and some even claim they legitimately enjoyed their trip, but I sure as hell didn't. Not really a fan of hallucinogens in general anymore, and haven't been since high school really, but I would rather eat a ridiculous amount of mushrooms or drop an insane amount of LSD before I ever even touched that stuff again.
Post Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:49 am
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icarus502
kung-pwn master


Joined: 01 Jul 2002
Posts: 11290
Location: ann arbor
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Captiv8 wrote:
What the hell does "pulled the biggest whitey" mean? I'm laughing just thinking about the possibilities.


Me too.
Post Sat Sep 01, 2012 8:12 am
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T-Wrex
p00ny tang


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
Posts: 6405
Location: Detroit, Michigan
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icarus502 wrote:
Captiv8 wrote:
What the hell does "pulled the biggest whitey" mean? I'm laughing just thinking about the possibilities.


Me too.


Post Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:52 pm
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zeem



Joined: 29 Apr 2003
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Location: elsewhere
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whitey=going pale faced and puking.
Post Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:58 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8547
Location: Third Coast
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Hypothetically, couldn't concerns of drug sales be alleviated by a barter system? This would obviously rely on "love of the game" motives on the part of the manufacturer amd distributor, but at least the only legal concern would be possession. And let's say you were merely bartering reed canary grass, which is not illegal in and of itself. What's the problem? I suppose all of this falls under the broader umbrella of government regulation of naturally occuring substances. It still blows my mind that the government can dictate the cultivation of plant.
Post Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:02 pm
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mancabbage



Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 9263
Location: london
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zeem wrote:
whitey=going pale faced and puking.


yep, although not with booze.. worst i ever saw was a rather rotund friend of mine doing gargantuan lung full hits from a bong that would have made the best ethiopian long distance runners jealous of his lung capacity. Non stop for about 40 secs, put bong down, turned around, went white then hit the floor like a sack of shit. We looked at him and his eyes were open, mouth open, hardly breathing, seconds away from calling ambulance (we're paranoid as fuck as we've been blazing too) when he manages to speak n just be like 'dudes, fuck...'
Post Mon Sep 03, 2012 3:58 pm
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lord soth



Joined: 20 Jun 2007
Posts: 173
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I be he said it without the comma. More like "Dudes fuck."
It was a revelation.
Post Mon Sep 03, 2012 5:08 pm
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mancabbage



Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 9263
Location: london
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Naaa he knew that, the whole reason we'd been blazing was to calm down after the impromptu free love session that had just occurred due to us watching the dark crystal whilst eating Chinese food, fucking jim Henson
Post Mon Sep 03, 2012 6:53 pm
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medicineman
HALFLING


Joined: 21 Apr 2007
Posts: 1393
Location: Iowa City
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DMT is a lot like if salvia was fun or cool. That is, it's incredibly intense to the point where even a seasoned hallucinogen user could potentially be a danger to themselves. It also lasts a really short period of time and leaves you feeling pretty much completely normal in the aftermath except for the lingering sense of the intensity on sensation you just experienced. The first time I used it the entire world went black and it couldn't see anything except veins of different colored (energy?..) where people had been, in the silhouette shape of a human being, like everyone around me was just a circulatory system running around glowing in reds and ambers and blues. It was a lot like being in an Alex Grey painting. A more genuinely "psychadelic" experience than more hallucinogens...it's kinda like what you imagined tripping was like when you like fourteen before you ever did it. Not to make it sound awesome or anything. (It's awesome.)
Post Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:56 pm
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Hellen Earth
could be a girl. could be a guy.


Joined: 09 Jan 2003
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Location: Fitchburg, MA
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Yeah, I had a similar experience. It seemed like there was an underlying grid of glowing geometric shapes underneath everything.

As far as after-effects, I thought it was really amazing. I felt like a million bucks for three days after doing it, and had an inordinate number of people tell me i looked like i was glowing.

Also, dreams were very vivid for days after, and I felt like I could go a lot deeper during meditation.

This is def something I will try again, I think I may try and do a simple extract myself - it doesn't seem that challenging.
Post Mon Sep 17, 2012 3:29 pm
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Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
Posts: 2022
Location: Saint Louis Park, MN
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The US government successfully took down the Silk Road site last week.

The stories on it definitely make for some interesting reading, but for me (as someone who has not ever had anything other than a vague technical interest in a marketplace like the Silk Road) the EFF's roundup of the news was the best piece to date:
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/10/silk-road-case-dont-blame-technology

They're interested in defending Tor as a technology and Bitcoin as a currency, for the good-ideology reasons that criminal uses of that stack were able to hide their operations behind--but Bitcoins plummeted in value after The Silk Road's takedown, almost 30% off their pre-takedown trading value.

EFF stressed that it wasn't a technological attack on Tor that brought the Silk Road's operator down, but human error, border security, etc. But technological attacks are coming: http://allthingsd.com/20131005/us-intelligence-chief-defends-attempts-to-break-tor-anonymity-network/
Post Mon Oct 07, 2013 11:39 am
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
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I read up on the guy that started Silk Road and turned it into an international drug ring. Pretty incredible, really. He seemed incredibly casual about the whole thing, and made same seriously rookie mistakes regarding his identity. I can't believe he was able to keep it going for as long as he did. But as you stated, I still think there is value in preserving Tor technology and bitcoins. I also think that there is the inherent danger that this sort of thing can and probably will happen again.
Post Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:36 pm
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Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
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Like I was saying in that other anonymous-Internet-tech thread a few months ago: getting this stuff right is hard. Like I was saying in this thread last year, using these technologies to move real (non-Bitcoin) money or physical goods around is hard.

We've known for a while now that entities with a continuous presence on Tor over long periods of time can be unmasked. There are many different attacks on the technology, both on the architecture itself and on various software implementations of that architecture.

The guy running this site was using it to vacuum millions of dollars in Bitcoins out of the Internet, and in theory to convert that wealth into real goods and services. Over a long enough timeline, he was always going to fail. Having not shut down the marketplace and started to cover his tracks in the aftermath of the Snowden leaks was sheer recklessness--because now not only did he know that the US government could break Tor in targeted operations, he knew that they no longer had an incentive to keep this capability a secret.

In the long run what this is all going to look like is an arms race. Technologies like Tor and Bitcoin get too popular and they can be attacked and compromised. Once this happens they can be reasonably easily replaced with equivalent systems based on updated algorithms and altered barriers to participation--but the successor systems will have significantly lower value until a critical mass of users have adopted them.

It's just like any other form of systemic criminal activity: your best chance of avoiding arrest/capture is to make sure that shutting down your activity never becomes a high priority for law enforcement.

Black markets do not reward folk heroes.
Post Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:19 pm
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Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
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http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=230442617&ft=1&f=


Quote:

Police Arrest 8 In International Silk Road Busts

by The Associated Press
October 08, 2013 3:16 PM

LONDON (AP) Authorities in Britain, Sweden, and the United States have arrested eight more people following last week's closure of Silk Road, a notorious black market website which helped dealers to sell drugs under the cloak of anonymity, officials and media said Tuesday.

In the U.K., the country's newly-established National Crime Agency warned that more arrests were on the way.

Most if not all the arrests took place within a couple of days of last week's capture of Silk Road's alleged mastermind, Ross Ulbricht, in San Francisco, suggesting that authorities may now be busy unraveling the network of drug dealers who made fortunes peddling illicit substances through the site.

Britain's National Crime Agency said it had seized millions of pounds (dollars) worth of bitcoins, the electronic currency used on the site, and the agency's director general, Keith Bristow, said in a statement that other online drug dealers should expect a knock on their door.

"These latest arrests are just the start; there are many more to come," he said.

Silk Road gained widespread notoriety two years ago as a black market bazaar where visitors could buy and sell hard drugs using bitcoins, a form of online cash which operates independent of any centralized control. A so-called "hidden site," Silk Road used an online tool known as Tor to mask the location of its servers. While many other sites sell drugs more or less openly, Silk Road's technical sophistication, its user-friendly escrow system and its promise of near-total anonymity quickly made it among the best known.

Officials say the black market website brokered more than $1 billion in sales before the FBI collared Ulbricht at a public library on Oct. 1. In its complaint, the bureau said it had managed to copy the contents of the site's server something one expert said would likely provide international authorities with detailed information about the site's dealers.

"Any large sellers on Silk Road should be very nervous," said Nicholas Weaver, a researcher with the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley and the University of California, San Diego.

Silk Road's eBay-style customer review system means that months' worth of sales history are now in law enforcement hands, Weaver said in an email, while the traceable nature of bitcoin transfers means the FBI "can now easily follow the money."

Britain's Crime Agency said its arrests were carried out only hours after Ulbricht was detained. It called the suspects "significant users" of Silk Road and described them as three men in their 20s from the northern English city of Manchester and a man in his 50s from southwestern England.

U.S. authorities have charged two people in Bellevue, Washington, a city just east of Seattle, after identifying one of them as a top seller on Silk Road. He was arrested on Oct. 2, while his alleged accomplice turned herself in the next day.

In Sweden, two men from the coastal city of Helsingborg were arrested on suspicion of distributing cannabis over Silk Road, the local Helsingborgs Dagblad reported Tuesday. The newspaper did not say when the pair had been detained.

Britain's Crime Agency, which became operational only this month, said the arrests sent a message to criminals that the anonymity touted by sites like Silk Road is an illusion.

"The hidden Internet isn't hidden and your anonymous activity isn't anonymous," it said. "We know where you are, what you are doing and we will catch you."

___

Gene Johnson in Seattle and Karl Ritter in Stockholm contributed to this report.


See also: http://youtu.be/hGo5bxWy21g?t=1m14s
Post Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:53 am
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Mark in Minnesota



Joined: 02 Jan 2004
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Location: Saint Louis Park, MN
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Interesting reading on the portion of the total Bitcoins in circulation that belong to the still-anonymous person who invented the currency, and why that person probably can't spend them in any significant volume.
http://ideas.4brad.com/satoshi-now-time-consider-donating-lots-bitcoin-charity

The basic concern here is twofold:
1. Converting the "creator" block of Bitcoins to some other real currency gives credible evidence of who the creator is. This could expose that creator to unwelcome scrutiny, tax implications, even legal liability.
2. Moving the entire block into circulation within the Bitcoin market could easily collapse the entire market in Bitcoins.

The blogger (the very smart Brad Templeton) suggests that if the creator wants to circulate the currency without causing either negative outcome, donating large blocks of Bitcoin to charity is the way to go.

Some things Brad didn't explore in his post that I'd be interested in knowing a little more about:
1. What if the creator wishes to collapse the market? There are presumably various market bets one could make to earn a profit if the value of Bitcoin falls dramatically over a short interval, and the group that profits from these bets need not be the same individual that dumps the million-Bitcoin block into one of the currency markets. The creator could just as easily anonymously publish the cryptographic keys that keep the original block secure, let whoever acts on the publication first reap the "profits" from the original block, and take his/her own profits from hedge bets against the strength of Bitcoin itself.
2. What if the creator is eventually found by some organization like the NSA and bribed or coerced into secretly giving up those keys to a state entity? That state entity, which is insulated from many of the downsides of converting to cash, suddenly has an enormous amount of untraceable digital currency to use as assets in a cyberwar.
3. What if the creator _was_ a state entity, and determined that a digital currency was inevitable and that being first to market would give it a strategic advantage once its enemies began using the currency in their operations?

My opinion after reading this article is that the existence of such a high concentration of Bitcoin in the hands of any one actor constitutes a structural weakness in the currency itself.
Post Wed Jan 29, 2014 11:03 am
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