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Boom. No more iPods. (Or wallets)
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Strange Famous Forum > Social stuff. Political stuff. KNOWMORE

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Woland



Joined: 14 Sep 2009
Posts: 156
Location: Finland
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You can use Spotify on mobile devices in some parts of Europe. People use that for listening to music here, it costs 9,99 €/month for mobile (4,99 € if you don't want the mobile thingy), or you can use it for free with ads.

It pretty much means you can stream all the music you want from a huuuuge library (~ 10 million tracks and growing all the time) on your phone and it's relatively cheap. You can also share playlists and whatnot very easily.

This seems to be where it's at in this part of the world.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:09 am
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futuristxen



Joined: 01 Jul 2002
Posts: 19376
Location: Tighten Your Bible Belt
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Disharmony wrote:


When they come out with an MP3 player that is a few terabytes there will be no use for these web/connection based music playing programs. I doubt anyone would have enough MP3s to fill a portable non connection based player. Backups are easier than ever now with removable hard drives....why pay a monthly fee to store your music?



I think access is the main thing here, rather than storage. With a cloud all your stuff is up in this cloud. It sort of hovers around you, and you can access it anywhere with anything, without any lag or process. You don't need to burn cds into multiple computers, or put the songs onto this storage device to move them to another device that you use elsewhere for other things.

It's sort of similar to the reason I use google documents now for all of my writing, because I don't need to carry anything with me. I can sit down at any computer or anything that has a connection to the internet and some kind of keypad and write directly to the things I'm writing. I don't need to go through any software installs or anything. Just log into my gmail. click documents. And go.

To me that's ill. That's future think.

To be honest, storage of information should be an everybody thing anyways. It's speed of access that the focus needs to be on. You shouldn't need to actually download from the world cloud just to process something. It should be you plug into the cloud, you see what you need, you process, and in real time create information back into the cloud for others to access. I think our chief function as a species is information processing. To see everything, to learn it's qualities, and then harness those qualities in the pursuit of more things to see. I think to go mythological here, it's like Adam and Eve go into the garden as the big bang out from this singular one thing--they spread outwards even as they are designed to build the future in which everything goes back to this singular one thing. Movement movement movement until movement becomes stillness--until everything is perceived all at once--all knowing--rebuilding of the godhead. It could also be some sort of weird special freud thing. Who knows.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:19 am
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redball



Joined: 12 May 2006
Posts: 6871
Location: Northern New Jersey
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Asterax wrote:
redball wrote:
I think cloud computing will become integral to the PC experience. It will do that as mobile devices become what we use instead of computers.


Cloud computing is not only incredibly useful (I use it daily), but it is becoming the basis for a lot of new technologies and features. I am only playing devil's advocate.

However, I still argue it won't become a dominant fixture on every PC for every household in the United States simply due to the lack of universal broadband. I'd be more convinced of cloud computing's accessibility to all Americans when universal broadband access is also an integral part of the PC experience.

Also as we've discussed in a previous tech thread: true backup requires multiple mediums (three is ideal). There is certainly a case to be made that keeping a local backup is essential for when data is accidentally erased on the servers hosting your data.


True backup requires redundancy. Not different mediums. The Holy Trinity of Backup:


Quote:

If it's not automated, it's not a real backup.
If it's not redundant, it's not a real backup.
If it's not regularly rotated off-site, it's not a real backup.


http://www.43folders.com/2010/03/15/yes-another-backup-lecture

If your service offers that then you're set. Beyond that you might make manual backups, but those are more for quickly restoring data. Manual backups fail as true backups in that they are not automated and they are harder to rotate off-site. If you can't trust your backup service then you shouldn't be using it.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:07 am
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redball



Joined: 12 May 2006
Posts: 6871
Location: Northern New Jersey
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When they come out with an MP3 player that's a few terabytes it will have 3G service and will sync with the cloud. People are going to look back at cable based syncing the way we look at 3.5" floppy disks.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:10 am
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icarus502
kung-pwn master


Joined: 01 Jul 2002
Posts: 11291
Location: ann arbor
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redball wrote:
When they come out with an MP3 player that's a few terabytes it will have 3G service and will sync with the cloud. People are going to look back at cable based syncing the way we look at 3.5" floppy disks.


Seriously. The only way they continue to produce the iPod or iTouch in a few years is if they come with some kind of built-in, low-cost cloud and internet radio. There's clear precedent, in the nook and Kindle for mobile devices with free, built-in, 3G connectivity. Obviously, web-browsing and ebook reading are cheap and music would require much, much more bandwidth. But it's precedent. And Apple has a data farm basically RTG, apparently, for iPhone cloud support.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:48 am
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Eric B



Joined: 30 May 2005
Posts: 1327
Location: Omaha, Ne
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I don't know about the PC dying. Maybe to the casual home users, who only need web, email, music and the occasional document. I'd jab my eyeballs out if I had to code on an ipad though.

I can agree that Ipods will be obsolete eventually. There will still be a niche market though for inexpensive MP3 players. The use that comes to mind for me is that I don't want my smart phone banging around when I'm at the gym. I'd rather use a cheapo mp3 player while working out.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:32 am
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redball



Joined: 12 May 2006
Posts: 6871
Location: Northern New Jersey
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Cheap products is where old technology goes to die. The point isn't that in 2 years no corded digital music players will exist. It's that in a short time the higher end stuff will all sync via the cloud and the middle tier stuff will follow that.

As for the PC dying... It will certainly live on to some extent. I think corporations will start moving back to a thin-client style of machine where the box on your desk will be similar to the Apple TV in size and it'll hold enough crap locally to survive a short term network outage but that's about it. At home there will be more single unit devices like the iMac and other forms of desktop computers will become less and less frequent, rapidly being replaced by phones and laptops. The current laptop set will likely use tablets and phones and heavy keyboard interaction will be facilitated with setups like this:



If you have a laptop now and you dock it to get bigger screens and better keyboard then imagine the same setup, only you've dropped your phone into a cradle instead. There will be that too.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:44 am
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Disharmony



Joined: 01 Jun 2003
Posts: 3027
Location: Buried in Minnesota dirt.
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It's weird how cloud is becoming synonymous with network already.

Redball is right, most new MP3 playing devices will have 3g networks, but you're better off just getting an mp3 player and a phone in one combination....depending on the price.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:09 am
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mortalthoughts
LAME KID


Joined: 12 Dec 2002
Posts: 11616
Location: MI
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how will the infrastructure(mostly bandwith) stand up to all these people streaming from the 'cloud'?


my at&t internet allready gets bogged down during peak times(from about 5-8pm) and im sure everyones not streaming music through it
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:21 am
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mortalthoughts
LAME KID


Joined: 12 Dec 2002
Posts: 11616
Location: MI
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oh meh and streaming over 3G is bs might just be the coverage in my area but 3g lags really bad when trying to stream
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:31 am
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jakethesnake
guy who cried about wrestling being real


Joined: 03 Feb 2006
Posts: 6311
Location: airstrip one
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Twitter still blows whether it's popular or not. It's seriously some fucking shitty "software". I can't wait until a facebook comes and makes a myspace out of it.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:06 pm
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Asterax



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
Posts: 1883
Location: Maine
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mortalthoughts wrote:
how will the infrastructure(mostly bandwith) stand up to all these people streaming from the 'cloud'?


my at&t internet allready gets bogged down during peak times(from about 5-8pm) and im sure everyones not streaming music through it


This is a rather large issue that has still yet to be fully addressed by ISPs.

I am not as up to date with all the specific reasons, however I know that a lack of competition is part of it. There are only a few key ISPs in the United States, such as Comcast, Verizon and Cox.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:29 pm
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Asterax



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
Posts: 1883
Location: Maine
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The demographic that is located in a area where there is a lower penetration of broadband are (probably) older people with less technical literacy anyway. This is of course a generalization. Also a counterpoint to my argument is that, while there needs to be greater broadband penetration in the United States, the demographic I mentioned probably does not have terabytes of high-quality MP3s or other assorted files to store on the cloud anyway. However, I do not think "cloud computing" should be considered an integral part of the PC experience for Americans unless the option to store large MP3 files, movies, data etc. is available to the demographic located in areas with the lowest broadband penetration.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:35 pm
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jakethesnake
guy who cried about wrestling being real


Joined: 03 Feb 2006
Posts: 6311
Location: airstrip one
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Eh, there are people who live without cable or electricity. They aren't going to continue making CRT screens just because someone is too cheap to upgrade. Satellites give 100% coverage, at a cost. People broadcast live from the top of Mt Everest. I don't think broadband penetration has a large effect on the progress of technology anymore, as I alluded to earlier. Supply and demand. You will pay for a new flat screen liquid/plasma/whatever screen when your old CRT breaks whether you like it or not, the same goes for internet access (unless free wireless on a large scale becomes the norm like Icarus I believe, is saying).

Pretty soon you wont even need credit cards or shit like that either. Just a mobile device (probably one that can read fingerprints). Like, Maxwell Smart stylee. The only thing that is in the way is infra$tructure, etc. PC have to be around until a) download/upload speeds are as fast as processors, or until b) everything you fit in your home computer can be made small enough to fit on something the size of a flat screen monitor. Coding(compiling), gaming, video editing, anything that requires a lot of processing power will require it. Your average home "PC" may change form. You may buy an xbox for all your home computing and gaming, but a home system of some sort will be there. No one wants to play Black Ops on a phone, nor listen to Wiz Khalifa on one either.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:14 pm
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jakethesnake
guy who cried about wrestling being real


Joined: 03 Feb 2006
Posts: 6311
Location: airstrip one
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That's not to say I don't have Quake 3 Arena on my Droid.

Because I do.

But it definitely sucks.
Post Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:18 pm
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