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Revolutions throughout the Middle East!!!
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Alan Hague



Joined: 05 Sep 2008
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Location: http://askthedead.bandcamp.com
Revolutions throughout the Middle East!!!  Reply with quote  

This is a pretty amazing, sudden turn of events. Basically, spontaneous uprisings of the people of Tunisia over food prices and government corruption have forced the prime minister to resign and flee to Saudi Arabia. Since then, dozens of other government officials have also resigned. The government crackdown on protest has been pretty brutal, but even the military has been siding with/protecting protestors from the state police at times. Similar protests have been going on in Algeria and Jordan, too.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/world/africa/19tunis.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha2

More Officials Quit in Tunisia Amid Protests
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and KAREEM FAHIM
Published: January 18, 2011


TUNIS — The new unity government of Tunisia tottered Tuesday as at least four cabinet members resigned after street protests erupted over its continued domination by members of the ruling party of the ousted dictator, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali.

The resignations compounded the pressure on Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi, previously the right-hand man to Mr. Ben Ali, to resign as well.

As the evening curfew approached in Tunis, the new government, backed by the military and a tiny group of recognized opposition leaders, seemed caught in a war on two fronts. On one side were Mr. Ben Ali’s former security forces, which the government has accused of continued acts of violence.

On the other it was battling to hold the loyalties of grass-roots protesters in the streets, who demanded a faster and more radical purge of the old government. “You sympathize with the current government,” one woman shouted, expressing a common sentiment. “How are you supposed to represent the people?”

Some opposition leaders expressed fears that a collapse of the interim coalition — it would be the third rapid-fire turnover of power within less than a week — could trigger a military takeover. Yet, as the police moved forcefully to break up the demonstrations, many protesters said they thought they had much more to fear from the former ruling party, R.C.D., than they did from the Tunisian military, a traditionally apolitical force.

There was also a looming wild card: the revival of the banned Islamist party. The government said that for now it would continue to block the return of the party’s exiled founder, while he repeated that his party espouses a moderate pluralism.

Many Tunisians said they were waiting — some hopefully, some anxiously — to see what kind of rebirth the once-flourishing but long-outlawed Islamist political party might have. In a radio interview, Prime Minister Ghannouchi said that the exiled leader, Rached Ghannouchi — no relation — would be banned from the country until the government passed an amnesty law lifting a conviction he was given in absentia under the Ben Ali government.

The exiled leader, meanwhile, made clear that his party envisioned a society far more liberal and open than Iran or Saudi Arabia. In an interview with The Financial Times, Rached Ghannouchi said his party had signed a shared statement of principles with the other Tunisian opposition groups that included freedom of expression, freedom of association and women’s rights.

It remained unclear how much support he commands in the country. Some argued that Tunisian society today was too resolutely secular for the Islamists to find much support, after two decades of efforts by Mr. Ben Ali’s vast secret police to eliminate the party and cripple it.

“They have people who are 50 years old or 60 years old, but they don’t have anybody under 40 because of the repression,” said Ahmed Bouazzi, an executive committee member of the largest opposition group, the Progressive Democratic Party.

Others, however, argued that the religious convictions of Tunisians would assure the Islamic parties a strong base of support, especially away from the more cosmopolitan coasts. “Look, they will be easily the most popular party,” said one analyst who opposes the Islamists, speaking on the condition of anonymity to avoid angering family and friends. “No one can say anything against anything that is Islamic.”

Mr. Bouazzi of the Progressive Democratic Party said that over the last three days the military had helped to arrest about half of the 7,000 officers who made up Mr. Ben Ali’s personal security force, who the government says has perpetuated violence since his flight. “They charged them with felonies and killings and so on,” Mr. Bouazzi said.

Adding to the complexity of the political situation, the composition of the crowd in the street protests seemed to be changing. In stark contrast to the relatively affluent group that turned out to demand Mr. Ben Ali’s resignation last Friday —many of them joining the protests for the first time — a more determined core took to the streets of the capital Tuesday. They held their ground against the clubs of charging motorcycle police officers, hurling canisters of tear gas back at the officers before regrouping to return again and again for hours until the evening curfew loomed.

Among them were students, trade unionists and supporters of the outlawed Islamist party.


Last edited by Alan Hague on Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:35 pm; edited 2 times in total
Post Wed Jan 19, 2011 11:28 am
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
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this is really exciting for the arab world, especially for egyptians, who have been in a similar situation, suffering repression in the name of stability.

things aren't as bad in algeria. i think the rioting has died down since the government promised to do something about the food prices.

it'll be interesting to see what the new government will be comprised of. so far they've hired an anti-government blogger as the minister of youth and sports. i can't find the source but i believe they literally took him out of detention and asked him if he wanted to be a minister. the country needs a new constitution, so it might be a while before we see what the new tunisia will look like.
Post Wed Jan 19, 2011 11:42 am
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Mr Jenkins



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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This is a revolution brought on by a faltered economy, i assume it could spread? Poverty is the parent of revolution

has the new govt been formed? last i saw all the key positions in the new government were held by loyalists to the (ex)president. I'm surprised there isn't a single symbolic identity leading the revolution, whose in charge, how do they accept the new Tunisia?.. I guess its just like playing civilisation, there’s a period of anarchy after each revolution.

I knew id heard of the place before, I wiki'd it and it was where Rommel retreated from the allies in WW2
Post Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:12 pm
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crash



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ha... i'm playing civ right now.

i don't think that the revolution is going to spread per se, but it will inspire other people (especially the egyptians) whenever things come to a head. if this is in fact a revolution, and a reform government is put in power, tunisia could be a model for egyptians when mubarak dies and the elites try to put his son (or some other pos) in power.

i think there's no one leading the revolution because the previous government stamped down on dissent so effectively. there's very few people with the experience necessary to rule who aren't close to old guard.
Post Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:36 pm
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crash



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interesting analysis from the economist:


Quote:

Many of the region’s countries look, on the surface, to be far more fragile than Tunisia, with equal volumes of anger and far deeper social woes. But different factors serve to bolster even unpopular governments. In Syria the ever-present danger of war with Israel mutes dissent. The Egyptian state, despite its appalling record in running other things, wields a large force of riot police that is well equipped, highly trained and very experienced, and so less likely to provoke outrage by excessive violence. Egypt also has a relatively free press. This not only gives healthy air to protest, but acts as the sort of early-warning system that Mr Ben Ali, due to his own repressive tactics, sorely lacked.

There is another way in which Tunisia’s experience could prove subtly inspiring. “The one constant in revolutions is the primordial role played by the army,” said Jean Tulard, a French historian of revolutions, in an interview in Le Monde. So far Tunisia’s army, kept small to forestall coup attempts, has won kudos for holding the fort, and not playing politics. Yet it is the army which is believed to have persuaded Mr Ben Ali to leave. Perhaps a few generals elsewhere in the Arab world are thinking that they, too, might better serve their countries by doing something similar.


typically awesome pictures from boston.com

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/01/an_uprising_in_tunisia.html?camp=localsearch:on:twit:rtbutton








edit: from the nets

Post Fri Jan 21, 2011 8:06 am
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jakethesnake
guy who cried about wrestling being real


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http://www.npr.org/2011/01/21/133121640/Tunisians-Embrace-Life-Without-Censorship
Post Sat Jan 22, 2011 1:36 am
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crash



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http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/01/201112511362207742.html

egyptians are out in the streets of cairo in one of the biggest protests since the 70s. the demonstrations are illegal but surprisingly the security forces have not stepped in yet.
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 8:29 am
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crash



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my friend in cairo just shot this.
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 12:50 pm
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poopsnack



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my girlfriend is over there right now. She left Cairo yesterday, thankfully, but will be back this Saturday. Scary stuff.
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 1:56 pm
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MCGF



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good stuff!
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:06 pm
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T-Wrex
p00ny tang


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hungry people don't stay hungry for long!!!!!
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:02 pm
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adic



Joined: 07 May 2009
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crash wrote:
interesting analysis from the economist:


Quote:

The Egyptian state, despite its appalling record in running other things, wields a large force of riot police that is well equipped, highly trained and very experienced, and so less likely to provoke outrage by excessive violence..





The video you posted, which is great, seems to contradict the expertise of the riot police...

Nice pics as well...
Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:01 pm
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crash



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adic wrote:
crash wrote:
interesting analysis from the economist:


Quote:

The Egyptian state, despite its appalling record in running other things, wields a large force of riot police that is well equipped, highly trained and very experienced, and so less likely to provoke outrage by excessive violence..





The video you posted, which is great, seems to contradict the expertise of the riot police...

Nice pics as well...

the riot police are well trained. i think they backed off yesterday because they were worried about inciting further violence. today though, they came down hard. my friend who shot that video was arrested and beaten. no broken bones but he has some bruised ribs and he face is scuffed up.

here's some more video from yesterday:

Post Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:32 am
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T-Wrex
p00ny tang


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I love the baguette machine gun picture...
Post Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:25 pm
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Captiv8



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T-Wrex wrote:
hungry people don't stay hungry for long!!!!!


You just sent my on a RATM tangent. Well done.

The Yes We Can/ Yes We Do picture is awesome. I was in the gym the other day and an old dude was in their with a Just Did It t-shirt. This is like the same thing, but with cause and revolt.
Post Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:21 pm
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