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Strange Famous Forum > Social stuff. Political stuff. KNOWMORE

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Confidential



Joined: 23 Jan 2004
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Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 10:33 am
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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Please tell me the above image isn't a real advert.
Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:50 am
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RealJustice



Joined: 04 Sep 2002
Posts: 1193
Location: Abstract Packistan
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I believe that is real. Station 280 rolls like that.
Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:56 am
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Mikal kHill



Joined: 29 Jun 2002
Posts: 6844
Location: http://mikalkhill.com
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Now that's what I call racism!
Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:39 pm
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Mikal kHill



Joined: 29 Jun 2002
Posts: 6844
Location: http://mikalkhill.com
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Found their facebook page:


Station 280 on Como would like to sincerely apologize to the Native American population for the Thanksgiving flyer. It was never our intention to alianate or offend anyone and we recognize that the message portrayed in the flyer was insensitive and did just that. Our goal will continue to be to provide an exciting and positive atmosphere for all people to enjoy.
Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 12:40 pm
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sloe t
self-worthlessness


Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 685
Location: ellensburg, wa
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here is a thanksgiving rap song i wrote, haha.

yo turkey by sloe t

happy thanksgiving, y'all!
Post Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:03 pm
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badjerk



Joined: 16 Apr 2006
Posts: 427
Location: pdx
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Mark in Minnesota wrote:
I was estranged from my father and his side of my extended family for a period of nearly ten years, from my middle teens to my early twenties. Once I was ready to reconcile with my father there was still a pretty big gap to close with everyone I had excluded from my life. Thanksgiving was the thing, more than anything else, which helped that to happen. Sharing hospitality in a context where the gathering was more about the day than about the people... without that, I don't think I would have gotten the chance to know my two little cousins as young adults, and they've turned into very cool people who I hope to have a lifelong relationship with.

Our sense of ritual on that day doesn't have a lot to do with the pilgrims, either; the people on this side of my family are descended pretty much entirely from 20th century immigrants into northern Minnesota; my grandparents and great grandparents on that side were denied access to certain jobs and denied a certain amount of agency in the politics of their region and nation, scrutinized as possible communists solely on the basis of their national origin. Finnish food is always at least a small part of our family meals, and because of the Thanksgiving emphasis on family this is especially true on that holiday. This is at least part of the reason this holiday always makes me think of my estrangement from my family--because my family gatherings are always at least partially a meditation on our collective estrangement from the culture my father's grandparents left behind when they immigrated here.

So, Thanksgiving doesn't feel like a national holiday for me, or a celebration of anything particularly American -- especially not the way it did when I was a kid, celebrating with both my parents together or with my mother and her family. Instead, Thanksgiving feels like nothing more than a time to be near family and to share a meal of harvest food. My gratitude is for being part of something larger than myself, when I'm otherwise pretty solitary and self-interested throughout the year.

But is there something bigger to celebrate here, some cultural pride worth celebrating today? Half my blood as an American comes from European refugees who fled their homeland in the 20th century; fled war and famine and a coming conflict with the Soviet Union that killed a hell of a lot of people. Whatever crimes against peoples were committed in the foundation of this country, what this country became following its foundation was a place of refuge from much of the religious, ethnic, and political balkinization which produced so much conflict in other parts of the world. It's still a part of who we are today, to the point where I find myself thinking about the Hmong and Somali populations in the Twin Cities, first- and second-generation refugees from conflicts even more desperate, bloody, and protracted than the ones that brought my great-grandparents here. I wonder if those immigrants will be celebrating something today, or if they'll share in the guilt and cynicism that fills this thread.

I do understand the value in mourning the loss of the many cultures which populated these lands before European colonialism pushed them all into near-extinction. I'm not at peace with that history and we certainly shouldn't whitewash it but I also don't feel like the need for a more truthful reconciliation with the remnants of those cultures requires us to not hold celebrations of our own culture; the same relentless homogenization that this forum likes to discuss as a grave tragedy has been and still remains a kind of open door for people who are fleeing much more immediate and ongoing tragedies elsewhere in the world.

I suppose I think that's an outcome worth celebrating, and certainly one worth being thankful for. I also think it's an outcome very much in the spirit of the holiday's traditional pilgrims-and-Indians imagery.


Thanks MIM.
I enjoyed both this and the Burroughs poem, and I think thats just fine.
Post Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:43 am
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kese



Joined: 16 Mar 2003
Posts: 5454
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Pretty cool link to how Native American names shape the US.

Nat Geo Native America

Pawtucket, RI is represented: "Waterfall Place"
Post Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:22 pm
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Captiv8



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 8423
Location: Third Coast
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kese wrote:
Pretty cool link to how Native American names shape the US.

Nat Geo Native America

Pawtucket, RI is represented: "Waterfall Place"


Terrific find, Kese! I've wondered about a lot of places in the US for a long time.
Post Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:35 pm
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