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mos def vs sage francis
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Strange Famous Forum > Press/Interviews/reviews

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Sage Francis
Self Fighteous


Joined: 30 Jun 2002
Posts: 21534
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I've played Columbus a few times. Sorry you missed the shows.

Ohio is a tough market.
Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:33 pm
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poopsnack



Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 2839
Location: Mid West
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I probably wasn't hip to you when you played. :( I have been wanting to catch a show for a while now, and hopefully with my East Coast work travels I can coordinate something.

I remember you being in Cleveland one night when I couldn't make it. Regrets...
Post Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:45 pm
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Reggie



Joined: 01 Jul 2002
Posts: 5765
Location: Queens, NYC
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Sage Francis wrote:
I've played Columbus a few times. Sorry you missed the shows.

Ohio is a tough market.


SAGE FRANCIS CLAPS BACK AT MOS DEF!!!!!

CROSS-POST OPPORTUNITY, EMPLOYEE!!!
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 7:32 am
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poisonfree



Joined: 23 Aug 2002
Posts: 1516
Location: Macramento
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I like black on both sides, It's pretty solid.

and I do think customer service/not being a prick has a lot to do with how often, or how happy I will be about spending my money.

IE: MF DOOM not ever fucking showing up! I don't give him my pennies now.

Common courtesy my man...common courtesy.

There are 23842873823 talented musicians, but are they able to represent it? Sell it? and make you not feel like an idiot for buying it?

I have no quips over downloading a song from an artist who doesn't send me CD's I order, or skips out on shows without giving refunds.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 7:40 am
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bigsole
Bought his character on ebay


Joined: 27 Aug 2002
Posts: 720
Location: the o
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tommi teardrop wrote:
I hate on "conscious rap" as much as the next guy, but there is no denying that Blackstar and Black on Both Sides are good albums. I might go so far as to say that Black on Both Sides is a classic.

These kinds of rappers catch so much heat for falling off while guys like Ras Kass, Monch and Saafir get remembered for their better moments. I'm not sure why that is.


because they were innovators.


saafir, pharoahe, and ras kass all came with styles no one had ever heard before and also pushed limited of lyrics as well, at least for the time. i mean compare "nature of the threat" by ras kass to anything mos def has ever done, lyrically, its a history lesson! CASE CLOSED!!!!!!! they were rappers rappers, rappers could listen to them and get inspired...

personally i havent enjoyed anything any of these guys have made since 96 or so. these 3 were too smart to try to dumb their shit down for pop appeal and when they tried to people lost interest, and why they are remembered for their great works. same for rakim... i mean... does anyone talk about his shit he's done since y2k or even krs for that matter? how about bob dylan or neil young?

god forbid people remember artists for their great works.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 9:45 am
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Stumbleweed



Joined: 09 Mar 2005
Posts: 9740
Location: Denver
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Monch could've recorded his verse for "Bring It On" and got hit by a bus and he'd still be very high on my list.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 9:53 am
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phataccino



Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 4771
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Stumbleweed wrote:
Monch could've recorded his verse for "Bring It On" and got hit by a bus and he'd still be very high on my list.

Haha...no shit. I was having a conversation the other day about what people would have been better off (legacy wise) if they were hit by a bus, and when that bus hit would have had to take place. First on my list is Eddie Murphy, who, if he were hit by a bus after he finished shooting Another 48 Hours, would probably be remembered as the best comedian of his generation. Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry rank up there too, if they would have been hit by a bus together after the '91 season.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:16 am
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BKGSP



Joined: 09 Jul 2002
Posts: 2354
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Wow, to each their own but I was a Mos Def fan pre-Black on Both Sides...I thought that album was somewhat mediocre with only a few good tracks....Black Star was the pinnacle of Mos Def and Talib Kweli's musical career as far as I'm concerned...I cant say I enjoyed or even checked for any Mos Def material after that...but back in the Rawkus days, Mos Def was dope...not sure what you people are talking about

On a side note, Saafir's Boxcar Sessions is one of the dopest albums
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:18 am
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tommi teardrop



Joined: 12 Apr 2007
Posts: 2213
Location: Las Vegas
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bigsole wrote:
god forbid people remember artists for their great works.
I don't disagree with anything you said. I would just rather hear people give Common, Talib and Mos the same respect for their early work and not constantly shit all over them because of their most recent failures.

I think it has less to do with their lack of innovation than it does with the way they are viewed as incense burning, bookstore-revolutionary, headwrap, do-gooders.

And personally, whether they were as innovative or not, I think Ressurection and Black on Both Sides were as important as Soul On Ice, Boxcar Sessions or Stress. I know the latter albums get deified by rap fans, but as cohesive, thematic albums, I think Resurrection and Black on Both Sides are both excellent and the artists behind them should get at least a fraction of the “look past their recent failures” that Saafir, Monch, Ras Kass get.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 12:05 pm
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crash



Joined: 07 Aug 2003
Posts: 5456
Location: the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption
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Quote:

I think it has less to do with their lack of innovation than it does with the way they are viewed as incense burning, bookstore-revolutionary, headwrap, do-gooders.
Post Wed Sep 24, 2008 12:30 pm
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benjy compson



Joined: 01 Feb 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: cliffs of opal
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bigsole wrote:
tommi teardrop wrote:


These kinds of rappers catch so much heat for falling off while guys like Ras Kass, Monch and Saafir get remembered for their better moments. I'm not sure why that is.


because they were innovators.


saafir, pharoahe, and ras kass all came with styles no one had ever heard before and also pushed limited of lyrics as well, at least for the time. i mean compare "nature of the threat" by ras kass to anything mos def has ever done, lyrically, its a history lesson! CASE CLOSED!!!!!!! they were rappers rappers, rappers could listen to them and get inspired...



well put.




that era in hiphop history will, perhaps, never have an equal
Post Sat Sep 27, 2008 6:15 pm
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DM



Joined: 05 Jul 2002
Posts: 6371
Location: www.NERDTORIOUS.com
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Stumbleweed wrote:
Monch could've recorded his verse for "Bring It On" and got hit by a bus and he'd still be very high on my list.


Word. Dave Tompkins wrote something like "Monch raps like he's in control of every cell in his body" or something very similar. I couldn't agree more.
Post Sat Sep 27, 2008 6:22 pm
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